Archive for August, 2009

Me, According to Song Titles

August 17, 2009

Kerry According to Eagles Song Titles

Using only song names from ONE ARTIST, answer these questions. You can’t use the artist I used. Try not to repeat a song title. It’s a lot harder than you think! Re-post as “My Life According to One Band”

Are you a male or female:
Witchy Woman

Describe Yourself:
Victim of Love

How do you feel:
Desperado

Describe where you currently live:
Hotel California

If you could go anywhere where would you go?
Take It To the Limit

Your Favorite Form of Transportation:
Midnight Flyer

Your Best Friend is:
Heartache Tonight

What’s the weather like:
Tequila Sunrise

Favourite Time of Day:
Peaceful Easy Feeling

If your life was a TV show, what would it be called:
The Sad Cafe

What is life to you:
One of these nights

Your fear:
There’s a hole in the world tonight

What is the best advice you have to give:
Take It Easy.

Thought for the day:
Love Will Keep us Alive

How I would like to die:
After the Thrill Is Gone

My motto:

Get over it!

Kerry According to Crosby, Stills & Nash song titles

Using only song names from ONE ARTIST, answer these questions. You can’t use the artist I used. Try not to repeat a song title. It’s a lot harder than you think! Re-post as “My Life According to One Band”

Are you a male or female:
Suite Judy Blue Eyes

Describe Yourself:
Dark Star

How do you feel:
Helplessly Hoping

Describe where you currently live:
Our House/Down By The River

If you could go anywhere where would you go?
Southern Cross

Your Favorite Form of Transportation:
Wooden Ships

Your Best Friend is:
Love the One You’re With

What’s the weather like:
Cold Rain

Favourite Time of Day:
Daylight Again

If your life was a TV show, what would it be called:
For What It’s Worth

What is life to you:
And So It Goes

Your fear:
Shadow Captain

What is the best advice you have to give:
We’ve gotta get back to the garden.

Thought for the day:
Teach Your Children Well

How I would like to die:
Just a Song Before I Go

My motto:
Carry/Kerry On.

Kerry According to Melissa Etheridge Song Titles

Using only song names from ONE ARTIST, answer these questions. You can’t use the artist I used. Try not to repeat a song title. It’s a lot harder than you think! Re-post as “My Life According to One Band”

Are you a male or female:
Yes I Am

Describe Yourself:
Brave & Crazy

How do you feel:
Giant

Describe where you currently live:
Shriner’s Park

If you could go anywhere where would you go?
Refugee

Your Favorite Form of Transportation:
I Run for Life

Your Best Friend is:
Heroes & Friends

What’s the weather like:
Somebody Bring Me Some Water

Favourite Time of Day:
Breathe

If your life was a TV show, what would it be called:
Piece of My Heart

What is life to you:
All There Is

Your fear:
Never Enough

What is the best advice you have to give:
I Could Have Been You – You Could Have Been Me

Thought for the day:
Come on Out Tonight

How I would like to die:
This War Is Over

My motto:
Open your mind.

Kerry, according to Janis Ian song titles

 

Using only song names from ONE ARTIST, answer these questions. You can’t use the artist I used. Try not to repeat a song title. It’s a lot harder than you think! Re-post as “My Life According to One Band”

Are you a male or female:
I Play Like a Girl

Describe Yourself:
Breaking Silence

How do you feel:
Forever Blue

Describe where you currently live:
On the Other Side

If you could go anywhere where would you go?
Under the Covers

Your Favorite Form of Transportation:
This Train Still Runs

Your Best Friend is:
Society’s Child

What’s the weather like:
Tangles of My Mind

Favourite Time of Day:
Welcome to Acousticville

If your life was a TV show, what would it be called:
42nd Street Psycho Blues

What is life to you:
The Last Comeback

Your fear:
Tattoo (about the Holocaust)

What is the best advice you have to give:
I can make my peace, with Days Like These

Thought for the day:
Walking on Sacred Ground

How I would like to die:
Take No Prisoners

My motto:
“Truth is not the enemy.” (Janis Ian)

Advertisements

John Steinbeck Quotes & Writing Advice

August 14, 2009

We are lonesome animals. We spend all our life trying to be less lonesome. One of our ancient methods is to tell a story begging the listener to say—and to feel—”Yes, that’s the way it is, or at least that’s the way I feel it. You’re not as alone as you thought.”
The profession of book writing makes horse racing seem like a solid, stable business.
The writer must believe that what he is doing is the most important thing in the world. And he must hold to this illusion even when he knows it is not true.
Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen.
In utter loneliness a writer tries to explain the inexplicable.
~ John Steinbeck, 1902-1968
American Novelist and Writer, Nobel Prize for Literature for 1962
John Ernst Steinbeck
(1902-1968)
“Talent alone cannot make a writer. There must be a man behind the book.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson
________________________________________

John Steinbeck and Advice for Beginning Writers
“I have written a great many stories and I still don’t know how to go about it except to write it and take my chances..”
Dear Writer:
Although it must be a thousand years ago that I sat in a class in story writing at Stanford, I remember the experience very clearly. I was bright-eyes and bushy-brained and prepared to absorb the secret formula for writing good short stories, even great short stories. This illusion was canceled very quickly. The only way to write a good short story, we were told, is to write a good short story. Only after it is written can it be taken apart to see how it was done. It is a most difficult form, as we were told, and the proof lies in how very few great short stories there are in the world.
The basic rule given us was simple and heartbreaking. A story to be effective had to convey something from the writer to the reader, and the power of its offering was the measure of its excellence. Outside of that, there were no rules. A story could be about anything and could use any means and any technique at all – so long as it was effective. As a subhead to this rule, it seemed to be necessary for the writer to know what he wanted to say, in short, what he was talking about. As an exercise we were to try reducing the meat of our story to one sentence, for only then could we know it well enough to enlarge it to three- or six- or ten-thousand words.
So there went the magic formula, the secret ingredient. With no more than that, we were set on the desolate, lonely path of the writer. And we must have turned in some abysmally bad stories. If I had expected to be discovered in a full bloom of excellence, the grades given my efforts quickly disillusioned me. And if I felt unjustly criticized, the judgments of editors for many years afterward upheld my teacher’s side, not mine. The low grades on my college stories were echoed in the rejection slips, in the hundreds of rejection slips.
It seemed unfair. I could read a fine story and could even know how it was done. Why could I not then do it myself? Well, I couldn’t, and maybe it’s because no two stories dare be alike. Over the years I have written a great many stories and I still don’t know how to go about it except to write it and take my chances.
If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story.
It is not so very hard to judge a story after it is written, but, after many years, to start a story still scares me to death. I will go so far as to say that the writer who not scared is happily unaware of the remote and tantalizing majesty of the medium.
I remember one last piece of advice given me. It was during the exuberance of the rich and frantic ’20s, and I was going out into that world to try and to be a writer.
I was told, “It’s going to take a long time, and you haven’t got any money. Maybe it would be better if you could go to Europe.”
“Why?” I asked.
“Because in Europe poverty is a misfortune, but in America it is shameful. I wonder whether or not you can stand the shame of being poor.”
It wasn’t too long afterward that the depression came. Then everyone was poor and it was no shame anymore. And so I will never know whether or not I could have stood it. But surely my teacher was right about one thing. It took a long time – a very long time. And it is still going on, and it has never got easier.
She told me it wouldn’t.
1963
John Steinbeck